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I'm Brent Keane, I'm an Aussie in his mid-30's, and synchronicity, geekery & bloggery is what you'll find here. My other blog: Keane On Comics. (I'll update my FAQ page sometime soon, promise.)

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Posts tagged "Grant Morrison"


Grant Morrison, Comic Con Episode IV: A Fan’s Hope

Grant Morrison, Comic Con Episode IV: A Fan’s Hope

(via saxifraga-x-urbium)

This amuses me no end: Batman and Aussie hero Dark Ranger fighting crime in Melbourne! From Batman Incorporated v.1 #6, 2011; art by Chris Burnham. (The second panel is a subtle visual pun, as they’re in Batman Park - note the pigeon loft on the far left!)

kellibellyjellybeans:

Stephanie Brown’s teachers from Batman Inc.: Leviathan Strikes: Lady Gaga, Rihanna, Madonna, and Katy Perry.

Closing panels of Grant Morrison’s final issue of Doom Patrol.

(via kayfabe)

I remember walking alone as a child, chanting every word in the dictionary in the hope of finding my own ‘Shazam!’ Eventually, everybody searches for his or her own magic word: the diet, relationship, the wisdom that might liberate us from the conventional into the extraordinary.
Grant Morrison, “Supergods” (via mikeroe)

godiseven:

deantrippe:

(via The Freest Free Space Ever)

Animal Man basically covers 80% of this bingo

I feel it’s ironically telling that his most straightforward work of late (Action Comics) is what caused me to lose interest in Morrison’s oevure. (I still plan on going back and reading Joe the Barbarian & Batman, Incorporated, but I just don’t feel the connection with his work like I used to, and that’s a shame.)

(If) we emphasize our glory, intelligence, grace, generosity, discrimination, honesty, capacity for love, creativity, and narrative genius, those qualities will be made manifest in our behavior and in our works. It should give us hope that superhero stories are flourishing everywhere because they are a bright flickering sign of our need to move on, to imagine the better, more just, and more proactive people we can be.
Grant Morrison, Supergods (via operationfailure)

(via kayfabe)

…Man is a rope stretched between the animal and the Superman - a rope over an abyss.  A dangerous crossing, a dangerous wayfaring, a dangerous looking back, a dangerous trembling and halting. (Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra)

What If…Peter Parker was Superman?

That’s essentially what Grant Morrison & Rags Morales give us in the rebooted Action Comics #1, our first full look at the new version of the Man of Steel, albeit set early on in his career. Given that Morrison already gave us a near-definitive take of the Last Son of Krypton with All-Star Superman, he had a hard task ahead of him convincing potential readers that he had anything left to say with the character. His whipping the media into a frenzy of hype over his blue-collar, Springsteen-esque take on the Man of Tomorrow didn’t help matters either, but did Morrison deliver?

Almost.

Understand, this is not a bad comic. Were it an Elseworld or an alternate reality, it’d be perfectly adequate. By dialing back Superman’s decades of fictional evolution right back to Siegel & Shuster’s embryonic take on the character, we see that the essence of Superman is still intact (truth, justice, sense of fair play and righteousness). However, having it filtered by modern sensibilities is where this initial chapter comes slightly unstuck; it’s jarring to have this Superman run at breakneck speed across Metropolis while being filmed on somone’s Blackberry.

Our first glimpse of Clark Kent is also unsatisfying, as we see he’s a nice guy (aw, he pays his rent on time), but the nervy, unsure twentysomething we see contrasts far too sharply with the bombastic, overconfident Superman we witness in action (ho, ho) earlier on. And while subsequent issues seem poised to knock Superman down a peg or two - perhaps deservedly so, as he comes across as a self-important bully - that we can see this coming leaves something of a sour taste in the mouth; the stakes aren’t raised high enough for us as readers to take it seriously (what Brian Hibbs often referred to as ‘false jeopardy’).

The truth is, though, I liked this story better when Lee & Ditko did it in Amazing Fantasy #15 back in 1962 (or, if you prefer, the Bendis/Bagley reinvention in Ulitimate Spider-Man a decade ago): the use & abuse of power without a complete grasp of the responsibility it entails. We assume as readers that Superman will eventually become the character we know and respect (we hope), but the faux-retro stylings does character and readership both a disservice (with one glaring example I won’t spoil). Morales’ art, too, is a throwback: rushed, almost energetically sloppy, but you do get caught up by it.

I am intrigued enough, despite myself, to come back for the second instalment, as I’ve a feeling that the next issue is where a lot of the blanks will start to be filled in. I just hope it’s enough for me to see out the rest of the arc, ‘cos I never thought I’d say this: I’m not particularly sure I even like this version of Superman.

Damn you, Morrison. On both counts.

comicsalliance:

‘Batman Incorporated’ #8: Abort, Retry, Fail [Review]

At the end of Batman Incorporated #7, there was this great teaser image for the next issue where Oracle called Batman as he suited up in a crazy Tron-esque version of his costume, with the dialogue “Calling Batman! Big trouble in Internet 3.0!” It’s beautifully over-the-top, but at the same time, the idea of a 21st Century Batman fighting the comic book version of the Internet crime in a comic written by Grant Morrison, a guy known for making wild ideas work in his super-hero comics, is something I was looking forward to seeing.

This week, Batman Inc. #8 finally hit the stands, and as far as I can tell, the “big trouble” in this story is that it’s a genuinely awful comic book.

Read more at ComicsAlliance.

Oh, Grant Morrison, no. Wha’hoppen?

I do plan to read this myself, but given that Chris Sims has been one of my favourite comics critics for awhile now, I trust his opinion on this. (And those preview pages look fuck-awful.)

wilwheaton:

Goddammit, Superman. You used to be cool.

For your consideration, this gem from Grant Morrison’s RS Q&A:

I’m not using the costumes, just jeans and t-shirt, a Bruce Springsteen  Superman. The original champion of the repressed Superman, the socialism  and stuff, I wanted a bit of that.

Darkness On The Edge Of Smallville?
The Wild, The Innocent and The Daily Planet Shuffle?
Born In The U.S.A. (But Conceived On Krypton)?
Hey, you never know, it could work.
ETA one more: The Ghost Of Tom Jor-El! 

wilwheaton:

Goddammit, Superman. You used to be cool.

For your consideration, this gem from Grant Morrison’s RS Q&A:

I’m not using the costumes, just jeans and t-shirt, a Bruce Springsteen Superman. The original champion of the repressed Superman, the socialism and stuff, I wanted a bit of that.

Darkness On The Edge Of Smallville?

The Wild, The Innocent and The Daily Planet Shuffle?

Born In The U.S.A. (But Conceived On Krypton)?

Hey, you never know, it could work.

ETA one more: The Ghost Of Tom Jor-El!